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Brokenness

“While they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to his disciples, saying ‘Take and eat; this is my body.’” Matthew 26:26


Before I became a parent, I never realized how many times I would have to deal with broken things in my life. A number of years ago as my son Bryce was growing up, I had an gotten a cell flip-phone before they came into popularity. I was really proud of that. I put it on the counter and plugged it in to charge it. When I wasn’t looking Bryce took my phone from the counter and, in a moment of pure baseball skill, chucked it about 20 feet across the room and hit the wall. I thought he’s gonna be a star, but my phone was toast. I never realized how many times I would have to deal with broken things.


As children, we break toys…or phones. As adults, we deal with a broken car or a broken appliance. Occasionally we drop a cup or glass and it breaks. Living through a year of pandemic has brought its own wearisome burdens. Along with toilet paper, flour, and yeast, there’s been a painful deficit of hugs, of being with people we love, and of worshipping together. Most significant is the reality of broken relationships.

Broken things often tell a story of sorrow and disappointment, but there is also power and, occasionally, joy in what has been broken.

Great power for good or ill can come from a broken atom. An archeologist may rejoice in the discovery of a broken jar. There is beauty in the broken. An artist can take pieces of broken tile and create a mosaic masterpiece. But more importantly there is power, joy, and beauty in God’s broken things:

At the Last Supper, “While they were eating, Jesus took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to his disciples, saying ‘Take and eat; this is my body.’”

This bread Jesus breaks is His own body being broken by thorns, spear, and nails as well as by broken promises, hearts, and dreams. One of the things we should remember during the celebration of the Eucharist is Christ’s own brokenness. Therefore, it is only fitting to remember the reason for His brokenness: Our own brokenness.


Broken promises, broken hearts, broken dreams, broken bodies… Broken, as we ponder our own sins and consider the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. However, in His brokenness, God brings new power to our lives and the joy of forgiveness, grace, and new life. If God can bring the grace of forgiveness to us, can we not forgive others in their brokenness as well?


May by God’s grace, being our superglue, fit our broken pieces back together again. I pray you will join with us in-person at either 8 AM or 10:30 AM Sunday mornings or online at YouTube or Facebook. With blessings as always. Fr. Bill+

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